Who is Karl Egloff, the Aconcagua Summit record holder?

Who is Karl Egloff, the Aconcagua Summit record holder?

On February 19, Karl Egloff  set a new record on the Western Hemisphere’s Highest peak, logging the entire 50-mile endeavor in 11 hours, 52 minutes, nearly an hour faster than the previous record which was set only two months earlier by the most famous mountain runner ever, Mr. Kilian Jornet. Who is this guy that is snagging Kilian Jornet’s speed records? Egloff, 33, is a professional mountain guide from Quito, Ecuador. His father, Charly Egloff, was a Swiss mountain guide. After meeting his Ecuadorian mother in Switzerland the pair returned to her home country to explore the Andes. Charly started taking his son with him on expeditions at a very early age. By the time he was 15 years old, the young Egloff had already ascended mountains higher than 5,000 meters and 6,000m hundreds of times. Egloff, as a teenager, was drawn to soccer. At age 17 he moved to Switzerland to finish school. Between serving in the Swiss Army and attending university he trained to become a pro soccer player. After graduating with a Business Administration degree, Egloff returned to Ecuador and opened his guiding business, Cumbre Tours. Injury and age eventually dashed Egloff’s dream of playing professional soccer. He started mountain biking as a hobby, that led to racing, and after a year of racing he was named to Ecuador’s National Team and ended up racing in World Cup events. However his late entry into cycling prevented him from attaining the technical skills necessary to excel in international competitions. Three years ago, at age 30, Egloff shifted his focus towards guiding and altitude training. Once the porters...
The history of Vasaloppet, the world’s oldest & biggest ski race

The history of Vasaloppet, the world’s oldest & biggest ski race

The first race was held in 1922 over the classic 90 km distance from Sälen to Mora in Sweden, commemorating a 1520 historic event In 1520, the young nobleman Gustav Ericsson Vasa was escaping from the troops of Christian II, king of Denmark, Sweden and Norway (the Kalmar Union). Much of the Swedish nobility was in opposition to the king, and had nicknamed him Christian the Tyrant. In a move to silence the opposition, Christian invited the Swedish aristocracy to a reconciliation party in Stockholm, only to have them, including Gustav’s parents, massacred in what came to be known as the Stockholm Bloodbath. Gustav was escaping through Dalarna, fearing for his life if he were discovered by the king’s troops, when he spoke to the assembled men of Mora and tried to convince them to start a rebellion against King Christian, the men refused to join the rebellion, and Gustav started toward Norway to seek refuge. However, he was later caught at Sälen by two Mora brothers on skis – the men in Mora had changed their minds after hearing that the Danish rulers had decided to raise taxes, and they now wanted Gustav to lead the rebellion. After two and a haf years of war, Gustav Vasa was crowned king of Sweden on 6 June 1523 , having defeated the Danish king Christian and dissolved the Kalmar Union. Sweden has been fully independent ever since. Today Vasaloppet winter week has eight different ski races over ten days and there are also Trail running and cycling summer events. Vasaloppet attracts a total of over 90,000 participants every year. Outdoor...
Triathlon and Diabetes

Triathlon and Diabetes

A triathlon can take you over a long distance, and medical identification must be worn should an emergency happen and people are trying to help you. Competing in a triathlon with type 1 diabetes is arguably the biggest challenge that sport can pose to your blood sugar levels. Triathlons take place over a long duration and require severe intensity and aerobic endurance, which will necessitate vigilant monitoring of your diabetes. However, your diabetes is no reason for you to not be able to compete in a triathlon. A triple threat of swimming, cycling and running may sound hard to manage, but it can be done, mostly through a period of trial and error to find a routine that works for you. Wearing a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) can be hugely beneficial when competing, especially as some will function in water. This can allow you to check your blood sugar at any time of the race. Training Each exercise can have a different effect on blood sugar levels and require different approaches, especially if you train in all sports on the same day. Swimming can drastically reduce your blood glucose levels, so it is advised to start a session with a blood sugar of over 12 mmol/l. When training, especially as a beginner, you should stop swimming every 30 minutes and test your blood sugar. Eating some carbohydrate or consuming sugar during and after the swim will prevent your blood sugar falling. Running can have different effects on people, but testing your blood sugar before and after a session will be necessary. A reduction in your insulin may not be,...
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