5 Essential Nutrition Tips for Cyclists

5 Essential Nutrition Tips for Cyclists

Picking up good eating habits around cycling is vital to a successful enjoyable ride. Keep your fluid levels topped up Get into the habit of taking on fluid regularly, whether you are out on the road or not. Water is essential for carrying nutrients around the body and for regulating body temperature. Being dehydrated can lead to a significant drop in performance so make sure you get enough water on board. When the weather is really hot try popping a hydration tablet into your water to replace those electrolytes that are lost through sweat. Don’t leave fuelling to the last minute Have a pre-race carb meal 2 hours before exercise in order to top up your energy stores. Do not make the mistake of over-eating however as this may leave you feeling bloated. You can always top up your energy on the start line with an energy gel. Eat regularly during longer exercise Your body can store enough energy for 90 minutes of strenuous exercise, and then you’ll be running on empty. It’s far better not to let yourself get to that – so don’t risk bonking. Try to get into the habit of eating regularly in order to ensure you maintain performance and avoid getting jelly legs; even the pros can get this wrong. We recommend that 60-90g of carbohydrate intake per hour is optimum and this can be obtained easily from energy drinks, energy gels and bars that are perfect for popping in your jersey pocket. Practice your nutrition strategy in training You wouldn’t do an event without the necessary training so don’t eat during an event...
Marco Olmo – A Trail Runnig Legend

Marco Olmo – A Trail Runnig Legend

“In my life I am a looser, I run for vengeance – Io corro per Vendetta” Marco Olmo is a living legend of extreme running. He started late, when the others started to stop. In his “previous lives”, as he says, he has been a farmer, a truck driver and a worker in his village’s cement plant. He is now 66 years old and keeps on running international races Marco is from Robilante, a little municipality of the Piemont Region in north-western Italy. Born into a peasant family, when he was twenty he left the countryside to work in the town’s cement plant . His fate and life have been marked by this choice: still nowadays, notwithstanding his sport successes, he defines himself as a “loser”. Marco Olmo is well known in Europe, and particularly in his native Italy, but stunned many outsiders when he won Europe’s top trail ultra at Mont Blanc (UTMB) twice in 2006 and 2007 aged 58 then 59, ahead of top trail runners. UTMB is one of the hardest and most important endurance races in the world, over twenty hours of uninterrupted running, 167 km (over 100 miles) around the tallest mountain in Europe. An almost unimaginable race, where mental and physical training and personal motivations are fundamental. These are just a few examples of Marco Olmo´s achievements since the 90´s 1996: Marathon des Sables (Marocco) 3rd 1997: Marathon des Sables (Marocco) 3rd 1998: Desert Marathon (Libia) 1st Marathon des Sables (Marocco) 4th 1999: Desert Marathon (Libya) 1st Marathon des Sables (Marocco) 3rd Verdon trail (France) 1st 2000: Desert Marathon (Libia) 1st Marathon des...
DATEV Challenge Roth, the famous Ironman race which is not an Ironman race

DATEV Challenge Roth, the famous Ironman race which is not an Ironman race

The distance is the Ironman distance, even though the race is not part of the official Ironman series History The race has been held since 1990 on the Ironman distance and since 1984 also on short distance. It was formerly part of the Ironman series, until 2001. It has been held independently from WTC since 2002 with the name of Challenge Roth. These days it is known as DATEV Challenge Roth and it is probably the most important Ironman distance Race in Europe with over 4,000 participants.   The Course The first part of the race, the 3.86 km swim event, takes place in the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal around 10 km outside Roth. The subsequent 180.25 km bike course uses a two-lap course on the countryside, the course is mostly relatively flat with a tougher hill once per lap. The final marathon run goes once around a course with several turning points. Mostly the course goes on the same road after each turning point, so competitors meet each other. A major part of the course is along the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal. The finish is in central Roth.   World records set in Challenge Roth Men’s record: Jan Frodeno, 2016 – 7:35:39 Women’s record: Chrissie Wellington, 2011 – 8:18:13 Challenge Series Today DATEV Challenge Roth is a successful business model and mother race of the Challenge family. With over 40 Challenge races all over the world it is clear that organizer Felix Walchshöfer never regretted his decision to cancel the contract with WTC in 2002 and create his own Ironman race under the name of Challenge Roth....
Mensen Ernst – The first professional Ultra Runner

Mensen Ernst – The first professional Ultra Runner

Mensen Ernst (1795–1843) was born in the village of Fresvik, Norway. He made his living running, mainly through placing bets on himself being able to run a certain distance within a period of time.   PARIS – MOSKAU At the start of the 1830s, Mensen Ernst planned a journey on foot from Paris to Moscow, which he would attempt to complete in only 15 days. The departure date was set for 11th June, 1832, the twentieth anniversary year of Napoleon Bonaparte’s disastrous march on Moscow. Ernst started out from Paris at 4am. He ran about 2,500 kilometers in 14 days averaging over 175km a day Ernst was given a hero’s welcome on his arrival in Moscow, once his identity had been established (with his disheveled appearance he had been mistaken for a beggar; and in any case, he turned up a day earlier than anyone expected). After days of banquets and receptions in Moscow, he travelled to St. Petersburg, where he was presented by no less than Tsar Nicholas I himself. Add to this the 4,000 Francs that Ernst won from wagers, and it might be considered a good couple of weeks’ work. CONSTANTINOPLE – CALCUTTA On a later trip, from Constantinople to Calcutta, he spent 59 days, running140 kilometers per day. It is an incredible achievement to run such a distance without the proper gear and food, crossing that part of the world in the first half of 19th century.  THE LAST CHALLENGE His last trip started in Bad Muskau (Germany), and went through Jerusalem and Cairo, from where he intended to run along the Nile until he...
Who is Emelie Forsberg?

Who is Emelie Forsberg?

“Running is all about being in nature, in the mountains and forests. There’s so much freedom to be had and the best time is being in the mountains, where the clock and the world outside don’t count. Mountains are simplicity, freedom and responsibility — everything that I love!” Emelie Tina Forsberg (1986) is a Swedish athlete that has burst onto trail running scene like a breath of fresh air. She is a European and world Skyrunning champion and describes herself as a ‘lover of the mountains’. “I grew up on the east coast of Sweden,” she says. “There are just small hills there so I’m more of a forest girl really. But nature has been my playground since I was a kid.” She is mainly based in the city of Tromso (Norway) but if you are around Chamonix (France) maybe you can meet her coming back from her daily training around the Mont Blanc. Although Emelie has always loved running, she only started to take it more seriously from the age of 20. “Running doesn’t have to be hard,” she adds. “Just go out and explore and have a good time.”  Forsberg has since been crowned the 2012 Skyrunning world champion and won a string of races including Transvulcania, Ice Trail, Pikes Peak, Zegama… At the 2013 skyrunning championships in Italy she left with three individual medals — two gold and one silver. She took gold again at Matterhorn Ultraks and the future surely promises more. Running and the mountains aren’t Forsberg’s only loves. She also lists baking among her hobbies and her website is full of recipes for...
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